It's like the demands are being written up as the song goes. We didn't see it coming. A Michael McDonald sample hums underneath them. It's impossible to imagine, right? She aptly called it "Rock and Grohl, The Epic Battle." But I remember going to the premiere and watching the opening scene of the movie, … using "Footloose" (the song) over the dancing feet. Today, you'd probably call it extra. Each production choice, from the string arrangement to the mournful sax solo, serves to accentuate her delivery. He's forgiven for "Wild Wild West.". There's a real need for alternate canons -- especially if they include Kenny Loggins. More than three decades after Patrick Swayze gracefully lifted Jennifer Beals in the epic "Dirty Dancing" finale, the song and its film have had a lasting impact on audiences, who are well aware that, The song's legacy became instantly clear when it racked up a slew of awards, including an Academy Award for "Best Original Song," a Golden Globe Award for "Best Original Song," and a Grammy Award for Best Pop Performance by a Duo or Group. Often considered one of the greatest musicals of all time, "Singin' in the Rain's" signature song makes even the biggest pessimist want to splash around in a rainstorm, becoming one of the happiest movie songs of all time. (The drums! Zemeckis and his co-writer Bob Gale knew that rock 'n' roll was the connective tissue between the aspiring yuppie teens of the '80s and the scheming greaser teens of the '50s. The point of it is, the movie ["Beaches"] and the quality of that picture, the way it resonated with people had a lot to do with the success of the song I think. Also, we're not including any movie musicals. "See these eyes so green," sings David Bowie at the beginning of "Cat People." Featuring orchestral instruments, tense beats, powerful fx. ... One could cull a top-ten-song list just from Martin Scorsese's landmark crime epic, the most influential movie of the 1990s. We won't judge if you attempt to try the iconic dance at home, but watch out for any furniture in the way — an accidental dance injury would not be the time of your life. or just perfectly added to an integral scene, seem to transcend the films they were featured in. ". " Removed from the context of the Above the Rim soundtrack, which was produced by Suge Knight's famously tumultuous Death Row Records, it stands alone as one of the best songs of the G-funk era. This New Wave jam from the Scottish rock group Simple Minds provided the ideal romantic backdrop for John Hughes' suburban tale of adolescent pain, desire, and rebellion. Especially in the realm of comedy, there's a danger in getting too jokey and distracting viewers from the story you're trying to tell. Instead, it's content with its own gem-like shape, a pleasing dollop of a pop song. And the song. The track, written on the movie set, won the Best Original Song Oscar and two Grammys. (See, again: Wild Wild West.) At only 35 upon the song's release, Timberlake was already a music industry veteran, having been famous since his late teens as part of *NSYNC and through his solo career. Before there was Empire's Lucious and Cookie Lyon, there was Hustle & Flow's DJay and Shug. That's what greatness can do. Serving as both his sixth studio album and the soundtrack to his debut film role, we honestly couldn't choose between these two equally important songs. Presumably, when one arrives in the area of heightened vulnerability, which is perhaps best categorized as a mental state or philosophical realm, the inherent life-threatening qualities of the space become self-evident. The song plays at the film's pinnacle moment when nerdy art student Laney Boggs walks down the stairs after getting her makeover of a haircut and contact lenses, and while the premise is as cheesy as they come, the song represents all the best parts of teenage romance. With its infectious rhythm and Cliff's rebellious vocals, the title track was an excellent musical ambassador for the country of Jamaica, capturing the musical and political change of the region while still keeping your head nodding. The poppy, electronic hit so perfectly captures the essence of Ferris Bueller's sick day misadventures that we'd be remiss not to include it among the greats. The American Film Institute ranked Garland's wistful ballad as the greatest movie song of all time, and with good reason: Since Garland's wide-eyed, hopeful Dorothy donned those ruby red slippers back in 1939, the song, her character, and the film have cemented their status in film and music history, beloved by fans around the world across generations. Still, this song deserves a spot on this list for moving Chris Pine to tears. He's Shaft. My wife turns to me and goes, ‘This is gonna be huge.'" , with her powerhouse pipes, to set the stage for one of the most tragic fictional love stories ever told? You'd dial him again. For all the stylistic shifts that occur in the song, it maintains a sense of ever-building momentum throughout its run-time. It's alchemy. So when you do, be sure to "clap along if you feel like a room without a roof" … we're not entirely sure what it all means, but we're, ahem. Every year, the Academy Awards honors a musician with the Best Original Song Oscar, and almost every year, the Academy Award embarrasses itself. Plus, it's surely the only song to ever win an Oscar and feature the words "vomit on his sweater already, Mom's spaghetti," and we can't deny the power of that. It's not much of a surprise that the song has clocked numerous awards and accolades, including, Academy Award for Best Original Song in 1940. . The 50 best uses of songs in movies. How did that happen? The song may have never topped the charts, but it has amassed such a legacy that co-creator. Here are the ground rules: We're only including songs recorded and released for a movie. Audiences furiously kicked off their Sunday shoes in agreement, of course. Not even a decade old, "Let It Go" has already cemented itself as a modern classic thanks to Disney lovers young and old celebrating the song and the movie, making it a box office success and selling nearly 11 million copies upon its release in 2014. When she takes flight towards the end, hitting those "I's" and "you's" with surgical precision, you almost levitate, too. The film's soundtrack featured a slew of hits by the group of brothers and other disco acts, but "Stayin' Alive" is the one that inspired a generation to strut down the street in their best disco duds. After understandably freaking out, Bushell went back to work and recorded an original song of her own, dedicated to the rockstar. Critic Carl Wilson wrote a whole book examining the appeal of the Dion album this song found a home on. On their single "The Power of Love," Huey Lewis and the News combined the calculated earnestness of the older era with the slick professionalism of the present. The titular song to the Disney classic is one of the most striking songs from a film ever, and it's certainly one of the best from an already pretty stellar Disney catalog… especially impressive given that it was sung by a talking teapot, no? "What's it gonna be?" This is another case where we might be cheating by including this: Purple Rain is essentially a musical, right? Even when they're singing about potential heartbreak over that syrupy Organized Noize production, they sound like they're casing the place. At this point, it's hard to suss out the irony level of Tegan and Sara's addictive electro-pop banger, which also features a very funny Lonely Island verse. It's often forgotten that the ballad is actually a cover of a Dolly Parton song, and it made music history as the only, to reach No. The right music helps set the scene, sparking emotions from the viewer, even telling a story all on its own, elevating our experience and bringing us into the world being shown before us. Though the song was slyly deployed in Quentin Tarantino's World War II epic Inglourious Basterds -- and then rather cheesily used again in last year's spy thriller Atomic Blonde -- it belongs to the freaky realm of the cat people. "Regulate" is the type of song that envelops you. John Legend and Common's Oscar-winning inspirational anthem for Ava Duvernay's Selma is not as nuanced and complex as the movie it sprang from. And to make this a somewhat manageable task, we've limited ourselves to English-language films made after 1960. Ray Parker Jr.'s Ghostbusters theme, which spent three weeks on the top of the Billboard Hot 100 chart in 1984, is so effective because Parker plays it straight: The song sounds like it could be a jingle for a commercial you'd hear on late night TV. It's just, There are so many iconic songs from Disney films that are more than deserving of their own article, but we had to highlight a few important favorites. But some songs, whether specifically made for the movie or just perfectly added to an integral scene, seem to transcend the films they were featured in. "Happy" became the biggest-selling song of 2014, and even years later, it's impossible to go anywhere without hearing the infectious anthem. Classical chaos in the thrilling Germania opening battle, as the Romans pitch a mudfight against hairy, scary forest-dwelling barbarians. Looking for smart ways to get more from life? We won't judge if you happily sing along every time you're walking down the street — we know we do. Serving as both his sixth studio album and the soundtrack to his debut film role, we honestly couldn't choose between these two equally important songs. The song became the best-selling of 2016, and even if Timberlake has lost a bit of his "SexyBack" edge, we can't even be mad at him with such a jubilant, optimistic tune that will have everyone on the dance floor in seconds. Even 40 years later, he's still pushing. Even the best Bond movies are often too much -- the gadgets too crazy, the one-liners too cheesy, the plot too nonsensical -- but "Goldfinger" is just bold enough. It's the sound of history being written. "Elvis was a hero to most/But he never meant shit to me," he declares in the song's third verse, throwing down some music criticism of his own. That's the magic of Disney, isn't it? History hasn't exactly been kind to his assessment -- The Graduate's use of music had an immeasurable influence on New Hollywood directors -- but he has a point: Even the best song, "Mrs. Robinson," isn't exactly bursting with kinetic energy. The list of winners provides an incomplete history of the fascinating intersection between the music business and film industry. The two sound nimble, relaxed, and in total control. Frankly, it's a colossus. The work of filmmaker Jonathan Demme, the director of madcap comedies like Something Wild and chilling thrillers like The Silence of the Lambs, is brimming with the unchecked enthusiasm of a fan. The theme to Rocky III really had no business becoming as iconic as it did, but the song's legacy has endured thanks to the uplifting message behind its lyrics and those illustrious opening chords. When Bassey hits that final note, it's like watching Bond leap from an exploding building. 1 in three separate decades. Here's some context: The Dirty Dancing soundtrack sold 11 million copies and stayed at No. The poppy, electronic hit so perfectly captures the essence of Ferris Bueller's sick day misadventures that we'd be remiss not to include it among the greats. The skeletal rhythm of "When Doves Cry," which was created by a drum machine and features no bass line, was an aberration in pop music. "Men in Black" earned Smith a Grammy Award in 1998 for Best Rap Solo Performance, becoming one of the biggest hits of his music career. It's hardly a surprise that we hear the song pretty much. "Mr Grohl. (Or maybe a Huey Lewis song -- producers on the movie famously asked Parker Jr. to replicate the musician's sound, and he did such a job, Lewis sued him over ripping off "I Want a New Drug"). ranked Garland's wistful ballad as the greatest movie song of all time, and with good reason: Since Garland's wide-eyed, hopeful Dorothy donned those ruby red slippers back in 1939, the song, her character, and the film have cemented their status in film and music history, beloved by fans around the world across generations. A small tragedy of glances and sighs plays out between artists and audience. ", Both the song and the movie it was made for dominated in sales, ushering in a new wave of appreciation for the beloved ‘70s rock band, and if you can't help but belt this one out when it comes on in the car, we can't say we blame you.

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