Our latest podcast episode features popular TED speaker Mara Mintzer. In the early 21st century, Tamil was spoken by more than 66 million people, mostly residing in India, northern Sri Lanka, Malaysia, Singapore,…, …Sinhalese is Sinhala—an Indo-Aryan language—the Tamils speak the Dravidian language of Tamil. Coffee comes from Arabic qahwah, meaning coffee or wine, perhaps originally “dark stuff.” The word entered European languages about 1600 from Turkish kahve. The list is copied from a post in a different forum, thanks to original author. The seeds of the caraway plant, a member of the parsley family, have an anise-like taste and are used to flavor desserts, cheese, Indian rice dishes, and other foods. Omissions? Now in British English sherbet refers to a fizzy, flavored powder eaten by dipping a finger into the packet. Lemon may come from Arabic līmūn (a collective term for citrus fruits), via Old French limon (which means "lime" in modern French), although similar words occur in Persian and Sanskrit, making the origin uncertain. The word originally referred not to intoxicating drink, but to enticing eye make-up. Updates? The earliest Tamil writing is attested in inscriptions and potsherds from the 5th century bce. Find more Tamil words at wordhippo.com! Sometimes, though, the words traveled other routes from Arabic to English. The editors of the New Oxford American Dictionary believe that the Arabic word is probably derived from Greek karon, "cumin," an idea disputed by the OED. It is the official language of the Indian state of Tamil Nadu and the union territory of Puducherry (Pondicherry). In Old Spanish, it was alcaravea or alcarahueya, from Arabic al-karawiyā or –karwiyā. Origin v10.4.74-2471-f5be7d78. Loss of initial n- probably is due to confusion with the definite article (as in une narange, una narancia), but also perhaps was by influence of French or "gold." Tamarind refers to the sticky brown acidic pulp from the pod of a tree of the pea family, widely used as a flavoring in Asian cooking; the pod from which this pulp is extracted; or the tropical African tree that yields the pods. It entered English in the 16th century from Portuguese albricoque or Spanish albaricoque, but later was modified by the related French word abricot. In one of The Canterbury Tales, Chaucer describes Sir Thopas: “His heer, his berd was lyk saffroun.” The origin of the word is Arabic za‛farān. Du bist offline. Author of. (The word is carvi in French, Italian, and Spanish.) In the 1700s, alcohol acquired its current meaning: a colorless volatile flammable liquid that is the intoxicating constituent of wine, beer, spirits, and other drinks. Some of these words spread to other European languages, including French. Tamil inscription, 11th century, from the Brihadisvara temple in Thanjavur, Tamil Nadu, India. It was probably absorbed by the preceding /n/ sound in the indefinite article in French and Italian, although in some cases the n- was already lost in Arabic. Following the Norman Conquest, some of them entered English. The Arabs brought oranges to Spain and Sicily between the 8th and 10th centuries and from there the fruit spread to the rest of Europe. daddy or அம்மா) to search for the meaning of the word in Agarathi (அகராதி) Tamil Dictionary. The major regional variation is between the form spoken in India and that spoken in Jaffna (Sri Lanka), capital of a former Tamil city-state, and its surrounds. In the late 16th century, English got the word sorbet from French, which got it from Italian sorbetto, which came from Turkish shorbet, which goes back to sharbah, the same Arabic word that is the origin of sherbet. In American English, it refers to a frozen dessert made with fruit juice added to milk or cream, egg white, or gelatin. The flour made from the pods is sometimes promoted as a chocolate substitute (as if!). The shape of the letters changed enormously over time, eventually stabilizing when printing was introduced in the 16th century ce. It is also an official language in Sri Lanka and Singapore and has additional speakers in … Christianity draws its followers (about 7 percent of the population) from among…. The tree's original range probably was northern India. The cosmetic was still used in North Africa and the Middle East when the word entered English in the 1500s. Listing few below. late 14c., in reference to the fruit of the orange tree (late 13c. as a surname), from Old French orange, orenge (12c., Modern French orange), from Medieval Latin pomum de orenge, from Italian arancia, originally narancia (Venetian naranza), an alteration of Arabic naranj, from Persian narang, from Sanskrit naranga-s "orange tree," a word of uncertain origin.

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